IV. The Early Modern Period, 1500–1800 > B. Early Modern Europe, 1479–1815 > 5. National Patterns, 1648–1815 > d. The Iberian Peninsula > 1. Spain > 1698, Oct. 11, and March 13, 1700
  PREVIOUS NEXT  
CONTENTS · SUBJECT INDEX · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  The Encyclopedia of World History.  2001.
 
 
1698, Oct. 11, and March 13, 1700
 
First and Second partition treaties between England, Holland, and France regarding the successions to Spain and the Spanish empire (See 1698, Oct. 11).  1
 
1699
 
Famine resulted in bread riots in Madrid. The king, though gravely ill, rose to address the people and promised them aid.  2
 
1700, Oct
 
Charles named Philip of Anjou, grandson of Louis XIV of France and great-grandson of Philip IV, heir to his dominions. The king, long ill, died on Nov. 1.  3
 
1701–14
 
WAR OF THE SPANISH SUCCESSION (See 1701–14).  4
 
1703
 
The powers of the Grand Alliance against France proclaimed Archduke Charles of Austria king of Spain.  5
 
1703
 
Philip V introduced new weapons in an effort to mimic the French army.  6
 
1704
 
Walloon Guards created, reorganizing the royal guard.  7
 
1705
 
Charles landed in Catalonia and took Barcelona. Catalonia and Valencia, ever strongholds of anti-French sentiment, accepted Charles and supported him.  8
 
1706, June
 
The Portuguese invaded Spain and occupied Madrid but were driven out by Philip in October (See 1706).  9
 
1707
 
Catalonia, Aragon, and Valencia lost their constitutions, viceroys, and Cortes.  10
 
1710
 
Charles took Madrid. Philip and the French won victories at Brihuega and Villa Viciosa (Dec. 10), and Charles was obliged to abandon Madrid again.  11
 
1713, April 11
 
The Treaty of Utrecht (See 1713, April 11). Philip was recognized as king of Spain by Britain and Holland on condition that the French and Spanish crowns should never be united. Bourbon reforms: the new Bourbon dynasty pushed with mixed success over the next decades for reforms that would reduce feudalism, improve the army and firearms as well as finances, and encourage industry and trade (new roads, agricultural improvements, etc.).  12
 
May
 
The Salic Law was introduced in Spain to govern the succession to the throne.  13
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth edition. Peter N. Stearns, general editor. Copyright © 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Maps by Mary Reilly, copyright 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

CONTENTS · SUBJECT INDEX · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUS NEXT