II. Ancient and Classical Periods, 3500 B.C.E.–500 C.E. > B. Kingdoms of Western Asia and Africa, to 323 B.C.E. > 4. East Africa, c. 2000–332 B.C.E. > b. Economy, Technology, Society, and Culture
  PREVIOUS NEXT  
CONTENTS · SUBJECT INDEX · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  The Encyclopedia of World History.  2001.
 
 
b. Economy, Technology, Society, and Culture
 
From c. 7000–3500, a common material culture existed from Nubia to Middle Egypt, but after 3500, Nubian and Egyptian cultures diverge. Nubia remained primarily pastoral, but traded with Egypt, exporting gold, ivory, ebony, and exotic animals. Kerma period architecture is autochthonous, but Kush came under increasing Egyptian influence. After the Egyptians gained control of the region, they began exploiting its mineral resources. Under Napata and Meroë, a syncretistic architectural style developed. From the 8th century the Nubians utilized Egyptian hieroglyphics. It is not until 170 B.C.E. that the native language, Meroitic, was written. Meroitic has not yet been deciphered, and its relation to other African languages is unknown.  1
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth edition. Peter N. Stearns, general editor. Copyright © 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Maps by Mary Reilly, copyright 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

CONTENTS · SUBJECT INDEX · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUS NEXT