IV. The Early Modern Period, 1500–1800 > B. Early Modern Europe, 1479–1815 > 5. National Patterns, 1648–1815 > b. The Dutch Republic
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  The Encyclopedia of World History.  2001.
 
(See Cultural Developments) (See 1648)
 
b. The Dutch Republic
 
 
1647–50
 
WILLIAM II succeeded his father, Frederick Henry, in the stadholdership. Able, ambitious, and restless, William disapproved of the Treaty of Münster (1648), which recognized the independence of the provinces, and would have preferred to continue the war. He soon became involved in conflict with the states-general and, by arresting some of the leaders of Holland and attacking Amsterdam itself (1650), forced the submission of the state-rights group.  1
 
1650, Nov. 6
 
William died. His son was born posthumously.  2
 
1651
 
The Estates held a constituent assembly but only agreed to stop the possibility of recreating the office of captain-general.  3
 
1652–54
 
The FIRST ANGLO-DUTCH WAR, the direct outgrowth of the English Navigation Act (1651) (See 1652–54).  4
 
1652
 
Dutch South Africa founded (See 1652).  5
 
1653
 
John De Witt became pensionary of Holland and thereby controlled the general policy. An able statesman and adroit diplomat, he easily maintained Dutch prestige and greatness.  6
 
1657–60
 
The Dutch prevented the entrance of the Baltic from falling into exclusively Swedish control by supporting the Danish in the Swedish-Danish War (See 1655–60).  7
 
1657–61
 
War with Portugal, over conflicting interests in Brazil.  8
 
1660
 
Dutch states-general rescinded the exclusion of the House of Orange from the stadholdership following the restoration in England.  9
 
1662
 
The Dutch allied themselves with the French to provide against the danger of attack by the British.  10
 
1664
 
The British seized New Amsterdam (New York) and appropriated various Dutch stations on the African coast.  11
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth edition. Peter N. Stearns, general editor. Copyright © 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Maps by Mary Reilly, copyright 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

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