VII. The Contemporary Period, 1945–2000 > I. Africa, 1941–2000 > 2. Regions > e. Southern Africa
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  The Encyclopedia of World History.  2001.
 
(See 1935–39)
 
e. Southern Africa
 
 
1. North of the Limpopo
1945–60
 
Economic development led to large-scale urbanization and wage labor in Zambia and Rhodesia, leading to the development of a stable urban population of workers and families, accompanied by the rise of bureaucratic and professional elites.  1
 
1947
 
African trade unions were first formed in Northern Rhodesia.  2
 
1948
 
Seretse Khama married Ruth Williams in London, but the Ngwato people refused to accept him as their chief because of his marriage to an Englishwoman.  3
Constitutional reforms in Northern Rhodesia extended appointments on the legislative council to five years.  4
 
1950
 
Out of a population of about 5 million, only 4,353 assimilados lived in Mozambique.  5
 
1950–56
 
Successful organization by Copperbelt miners in Northern Rhodesia (Zambia) led to a wave of strikes in 1956.  6
 
1951
 
Six white members of the Southwest Africa House of Assembly took seats in the South African Parliament.  7
 
1953
 
Increased political activity in opposition to the proposed federation of Central Africa between Nyasaland and the two Rhodesias. Rev. Michael Scott preached nonviolent opposition to the federation.  8
 
1954
 
Rhodesian University College was founded.  9
 
1955
 
Africans were admitted to the legislative council in Nyasaland.  10
 
1956
 
A state of emergency was declared in Northern Rhodesia, following miners' strikes.  11
Pres. Craveiro Lopes of Portugal visited Mozambique. Its administrative districts were reorganized.  12
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth edition. Peter N. Stearns, general editor. Copyright © 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Maps by Mary Reilly, copyright 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

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