II. Ancient and Classical Periods, 3500 B.C.E.–500 C.E. > D. Classical Greece and the Hellenistic World > 4. The Classical Age, 510–323 B.C.E. > e. The Second (Great) Peloponnesian War
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  The Encyclopedia of World History.  2001.
 
 
e. The Second (Great) Peloponnesian War
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Corcyra, in northwestern Greece, objected to Corinth's interference with their joint colony, Epidamnus. Corcyra defeated the much more powerful Corinth but, fearing reprisal, called on Athens for help, and the Corinthians backed down. The Athenians then sought to break Corinthian influence over Potidaea, a colony of Corinth but a subject of Athens.  1
 
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Potidaea revolted against Athens, with the tacit support of the Peloponnesian League. Athens then retaliated with the Megarian decree, barring the Megarians from Athenian harbors and markets. Outraged and fearful of further Athenian action, Megara, Corinth, and Aegina pressured a reluctant Sparta to take action. Over King Archidamus's opposition, the ephor Sthenelaïdas convinced the Spartan assembly to declare the Thirty Years' Peace broken.  2
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth edition. Peter N. Stearns, general editor. Copyright © 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Maps by Mary Reilly, copyright 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

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