II. Ancient and Classical Periods, 3500 B.C.E.–500 C.E. > B. Kingdoms of Western Asia and Africa, to 323 B.C.E. > 6. Phoenicia, Carthage, and the Phoenician Colonies, c. 1200–322 B.C.E.
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  The Encyclopedia of World History.  2001.
 
 
6. Phoenicia, Carthage, and the Phoenician Colonies, c. 1200–322 B.C.E.
a. Geography
 
Phoenicia is the long narrow strip of land along the Mediterranean from the mouth of the Orontes in the north to Mount Carmel in the south. Its eastern boundary, the Lebanon chain, is rarely more than 12 miles from the coast. The most important cities were Arvad, Gubal or Byblos, Sidon, and Tyre; other cities were Marathus, Berytus (Beirut), and Ecdippa. By an arbitrary change of terminology, the Canaanites are called Phoenicians after 1200.  1
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth edition. Peter N. Stearns, general editor. Copyright © 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Maps by Mary Reilly, copyright 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

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