VI. The World Wars and the Interwar Period, 1914–1945 > J. Africa, 1914–1945 > 2. Regions > d. East Africa
  PREVIOUS NEXT  
CONTENTS · SUBJECT INDEX · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  The Encyclopedia of World History.  2001.
 
(See 1909, Jan)
 
d. East Africa
 
 
1914–18
 
World War I led to fighting between German and British forces, using African troops and porters, in Tanganyika (German East Africa). War proved disastrous for East Africans, who were forced to supply food, soldiers, and porters to the armies. Ten percent of the soldiers and 20 percent of the porters died, mostly from disease and malnutrition, totaling 100,000 deaths. War resulted in famine and disease throughout the region; cattle disease depleted the stored wealth of stock.  1
 
1917, Oct
 
The British defeated the German commander Lettow-Vorbeck at Mahiva; the Germans withdrew to Mozambique.  2
 
1918
 
Resident Natives Ordinance in the Kenya colony forced African tenants to work for white landlords at least six months each year.  3
 
1918–19
 
Just as the British occupation of Teso and Lango was completed, serious famine and rinderpest epidemic broke out in Uganda.  4
 
1920
 
Native Registration Ordinance enacted to ensure tighter labor and tax controls over Africans, who were now required to carry a pass (kipande). Wages declined as the postwar boom ended.  5
 
Jan
 
The British mandate over German East Africa went into effect. The name of the territory was changed to Tanganyika.  6
 
July
 
British East Africa was renamed Kenya and made into a crown colony.  7
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth edition. Peter N. Stearns, general editor. Copyright © 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Maps by Mary Reilly, copyright 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

CONTENTS · SUBJECT INDEX · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUS NEXT