VI. The World Wars and the Interwar Period, 1914–1945 > F. The Middle East and North Africa, 1914–1945 > 2. The Middle East > d. Egypt > 1919, March 8
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  The Encyclopedia of World History.  2001.
 
 
1919, March 8
 
THE EGYPTIAN REVOLUTION OF 1919. Strikes and demonstrations broke out throughout the country following the deportation of Sa‘d Zaghlul and other Wafdist leaders. This represented the first genuine mass movement of national self-assertion in modern Egypt. The British were compelled (April 7) to release Zaghlul and his colleagues, who promptly made their way to the peace conference in Paris.  1
 
Oct. 17
 
Appointment of Gen. Edmund Allenby as British high commissioner in Egypt to replace Sir Reginald Wingate.  2
 
Dec. 7
 
The arrival of Lord Milner at the head of a commission to investigate the uprisings of 1919. The Egyptians staged a unanimous boycott of the proceedings, and as a result Milner was unable to talk to any Egyptian representatives. Having made little headway, the commission departed for Britain in March 1920. Its report (published Dec. 9, 1920) recommended independence for Egypt contingent upon guarantees for the protection of British interests.  3
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth edition. Peter N. Stearns, general editor. Copyright © 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Maps by Mary Reilly, copyright 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

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