VI. The World Wars and the Interwar Period, 1914–1945 > B. World War I, 1914–1918 > 18. The Peace Settlements > d. The Treaty of Trianon
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  The Encyclopedia of World History.  2001.
 
 
d. The Treaty of Trianon
1919, March 21
 
The Hungarian government headed by Count Károlyi was overthrown by a Bolshevik coup, headed by Alexander Garbai and Béla Kun. This government became involved in war with most of Hungary's neighbors when it became known that territory was to be assigned to them. Ultimately the Romanians invaded and took Budapest (Aug. 4) just after the Bolsheviks had been overthrown (Aug. 1). The monarchists then regained control and appointed Adm. Miklos Horthy as regent (March 1, 1920). The Romanians were finally induced to withdraw (Nov. 14, 1919), under pressure from the Allies, but only after they had carried away most of what was movable.  1
 
1920, June 4
 
The Hungarians signed the treaty of Trianon, by which the old Hungary was shorn of almost three-quarters of its territory and two-thirds of its inhabitants. Czechoslovakia was given Slovakia, Austria received western Hungary, Yugoslavia took Croatia-Slavonia and part of the Banat of Temesvar, and Romania received the rest of the Banat, Transylvania, and part of the Hungarian plain. Hungary agreed to pay reparations, to keep an army of only 35,000 men, to assume part of the old Austro-Hungarian debt, to hand over war criminals, and soon. (See Hungary)  2
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth edition. Peter N. Stearns, general editor. Copyright © 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Maps by Mary Reilly, copyright 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

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