VI. The World Wars and the Interwar Period, 1914–1945 > A. Global and Comparative Dimensions > 3. International Relations > b. The Era of the Great Depression
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  The Encyclopedia of World History.  2001.
 
 
b. The Era of the Great Depression
 
During the 1930s, the major themes of global history were the continuing efforts to resolve the problem of war, first in terms of continuing the effort to find ways of eliminating war, and then in terms of limiting actual prospects of the major war that was clearly looming; and the efforts to cope with the economic conditions of the global depression.  1
 
1930, Jan. 21–April 22
 
LONDON NAVAL CONFERENCE. It led to a treaty signed by Great Britain, the U.S., France, Italy, and Japan, regulating submarine warfare and limiting the tonnage and gun caliber of submarines. The limitation of aircraft carriers, provided for by the Washington Treaty, was extended. Great Britain, the U.S., and Japan agreed to scrap certain warships by 1933 and allocated tonnage in other categories. Increased tonnage was allowable under specified conditions. The agreements were to operate until 1936.  2
 
Nov. 6–Dec. 9
 
Final meeting of the Preparatory Commission on Disarmament. It adopted by a majority vote a draft convention to be discussed at a disarmament conference called by the League Council for February 1932. German and Russian representatives did not approve, and Swedish and American delegates had strong reservations. The major problems involved clauses preserving obligations from previous treaties, especially those barring German equality in armament.  3
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth edition. Peter N. Stearns, general editor. Copyright © 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Maps by Mary Reilly, copyright 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

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