III. The Postclassical Period, 500–1500 > B. The Middle East and North Africa, 500–1500 > 2. The Muslim Middle East and North Africa, c. 945–1500 > d. The Ottoman Empire > 2. Defeat, Recovery, and Imperial Expansion > 1511
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1511
 
The pro-Safavid insurrection of Shah Kulu succeeded in capturing most of central and southeastern Anatolia and winning the support of disaffected Turkomans and Ottoman troops sent to suppress it. A force commanded by the grand vizier finally defeated the rebels and killed their leader. The revolt followed a decade of rising tensions in Ottoman-Safavid relations, as the new regime in Iran suppressed its Sunni subjects and sent out preachers into Ottoman Anatolia to spread the Shi’ite message and stir up opposition to Ottoman rule among the Turkoman tribesmen.  1
 
1512, Apr. 24
 
Forced abdication of Bayezid. This followed a prolonged power struggle in which his son Selim intrigued against him and eventually triumphed over his brothers, with the support of the Janissaries. (See The Ottoman Empire)  2
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth edition. Peter N. Stearns, general editor. Copyright © 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Maps by Mary Reilly, copyright 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

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