I. Prehistoric Times > I. After the Ice Age: Holocene Hunter-Gatherers (12,000 Years Ago to Modern Times) > 2. Asian Hunter-Gatherers
  PREVIOUS NEXT  
CONTENTS · SUBJECT INDEX · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  The Encyclopedia of World History.  2001.
 
 
2. Asian Hunter-Gatherers
 
Intensely conservative hunter-gatherer cultures continued to flourish in Asia after the Ice Age. In the more open country of the north, the microblade traditions of millennia earlier continued to diversify into ever more specialized hunting and foraging economies, as well as into emerging seacoast economies. The peoples of the tropical forests of Southeast Asia continued to rely heavily on bamboo and wood technology, and their simple culture was little changed from much earlier times, except for a gradual trend toward more diminutive, specialized tool kits. These tool kits reflect much more varied adaptations by these peoples to local environments, adaptations subsumed under the archaeological label Hoabhinian Tradition.  1
Offshore, in New Guinea and Australia, more specialized local cultures now appeared, many of them oriented toward the exploitation of specific foods like fish, sea mammals, and small game. In the New Guinea highlands, there are signs that people began to deliberately clear forests and plant wild yams after the Ice Age to enhance their food supplies as best they could. Human settlement was still confined to the islands of the extreme southwestern Pacific, for Asians still lacked the necessary boats and foods to navigate far offshore.  2
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth edition. Peter N. Stearns, general editor. Copyright © 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Maps by Mary Reilly, copyright 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

CONTENTS · SUBJECT INDEX · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUS NEXT