I. Prehistoric Times > G. The Spread of Modern Humans in the Old World (100,000 to 12,000 Years Ago) > 2. Eurasia and Siberia
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  The Encyclopedia of World History.  2001.
 
 
2. Eurasia and Siberia
 
To the east, other late Ice Age people adapted to life on the open steppe-tundra, relying on mammoth bones, skins, and sod to build dome-shaped, semisubterranean houses. The late Ice Age population of Eurasia, between central Europe and Lake Baikal in Siberia, was never large. Most bands lived on the edges of river valleys like the Dnepr and Don in the Ukraine, subsisting on mammoth and other gregarious big game, as well as fish and plant foods in the spring, summer, and fall. Eighteen thousand years ago, some bands along the Dnepr were trading raw materials and ornaments like seashells over distances of more than 100 miles.  1
Perhaps as early as 30,000 years ago, and certainly by 20,000, late Ice Age bands were hunting and foraging to the east of Lake Baikal. But it was not until after 18,000 years ago that people ventured farther east, into extreme northeast Asia.  2
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth edition. Peter N. Stearns, general editor. Copyright © 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Maps by Mary Reilly, copyright 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

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