V. The Modern Period, 1789–1914 > B. The French Revolution and Europe, 1789–1914 > 4. Western and Central Europe, 1815–1848 > e. France
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  The Encyclopedia of World History.  2001.
 
(See Nov. 20)
 
e. France
 
THE HOUSE OF BOURBON-ORLEANS (1700-)
 
1. The Restoration Monarchy
 
Monarchs: Louis XVIII (r. 1814–24) and Charles X (r. 1824–30).  1
 
1814, June 4
 
The Charter recognized the principles of liberty, equality, property, and freedom of religion, although Catholicism was declared the state religion. The government consisted of a hereditary monarch, a Chamber of Notables nominated by the king, and an elected Chamber of Deputies. Suffrage was extended to men at least 30 years old who paid 300 francs in taxes. These qualifications gave substantial voting power to the upper middle classes and large landowners.  2
 
1815, Aug 14, 21
 
Parliamentary elections yielded a large majority of ultraroyalists, who passed a series of reactionary legislation.  3
 
Oct. 29
 
Law of public security permitted the government to arrest individuals suspected of plotting against the state's security.  4
 
Nov. 9
 
A law against seditious speeches and writings strengthened the gag on the press established on Aug. 8. An amnesty law exiled individuals arrested for their involvement in Napoleon's One Hundred Days.  5
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of World History, Sixth edition. Peter N. Stearns, general editor. Copyright © 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Maps by Mary Reilly, copyright 2001 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

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